ETF Yearbook 2005. Teachers and trainers: professionals and stakeholders in the reform of vocational education and training

In the ETF Yearbook 2005, the editors Peter Grootings and Søren Nielsen argue that the general assumption that policy instruments will drive the necessary reform in schools is not well supported by empirical evidence. Teaching is not a homogeneous activity that can be driven by a small set of easily accessible policy instruments. Learning is context bound and teaching takes place in the school, which is a highly complex social institution. In spite of powerful forces for change, schools in EU partner countries appear remarkably untouched. Grootings and Nielsen argue that one reason for this might be that change has usually been something done to teachers as opposed to something done with them. Teachers in schools have generally not been able to develop a sense of ownership of change nor have they been really capable or motivated to make the reforms work. They support their arguments with pilot project experience. ETF projects have demonstrated the importance of intertwining teacher development with school improvement. They confirm that the work environment of teachers should be seen as a learning opportunity and thus be organised accordingly: schools, teacher training institutions and companies must help to integrate learning into the daily work of staff. If that were the case, teachers own professional experiences will also be seen as a valuable source for innovation and development of education and training. Teachers would then be recognised stakeholders in their role as professional educators. The book includes contributions from Mircea Badescu, Borhène Chakroun, Marie Corman, Peter de Rooij, Muriel Dunbar, Henrik Faudel, Dragana Gligorijevic, György Ispánki, Deirdre Lennan, Irene Anna Liverani, Xavier Matheu de Cortada and Simona Rinaldi.
In the ETF Yearbook 2005, the editors Peter Grootings and Søren Nielsen argue that the general assumption that policy instruments will drive the necessary reform in schools is not well supported by empirical evidence. Teaching is not a homogeneous activity that can be driven by a small set of easily accessible policy instruments. Learning is context bound and teaching takes place in the school, which is a highly complex social institution. In spite of powerful forces for change, schools in EU partner countries appear remarkably untouched. Grootings and Nielsen argue that one reason for this might be that change has usually been something done to teachers as opposed to something done with them. Teachers in schools have generally not been able to develop a sense of ownership of change nor have they been really capable or motivated to make the reforms work. They support their arguments with pilot project experience. ETF projects have demonstrated the importance of intertwining teacher development with school improvement. They confirm that the work environment of teachers should be seen as a learning opportunity and thus be organised accordingly: schools, teacher training institutions and companies must help to integrate learning into the daily work of staff. If that were the case, teachers own professional experiences will also be seen as a valuable source for innovation and development of education and training. Teachers would then be recognised stakeholders in their role as professional educators. The book includes contributions from Mircea Badescu, Borhène Chakroun, Marie Corman, Peter de Rooij, Muriel Dunbar, Henrik Faudel, Dragana Gligorijevic, György Ispánki, Deirdre Lennan, Irene Anna Liverani, Xavier Matheu de Cortada and Simona Rinaldi.