In demand: Career guidance in EU neighbouring countries

This report looks at the demand for career guidance services in EU neighbouring countries and provides a comparative analysis as well as policy and practical examples of career guidance in Montenegro, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Albania, Ukraine, Georgia, Russia, Egypt and Jordan. The issue of demand for career guidance services and provision has been somewhat neglected or underrepresented in similar and previous studies on less developed countries. However, this dimension is of crucial importance, in particular for transition economies and low- and middle-income countries for which whether career guidance should be a policy priority or an issue at all may be questioned. The report therefore analyses factors that influence demand for career guidance in the labour market and the economy, in education systems and in the policy climate. It examines the empirical evidence for career guidance demand and then analyses some of the factors that act as barriers to this demand being realised. The report also describes and analyses existing provision and models of career guidance in EU neighbouring countries, and introduces examples of innovative policies and interesting practices that are being adopted in order to respond to demand. It concludes with an analysis of the ways in which response to demand can be improved by strategic leadership, and discusses opportunities and constraints in responding to demand for services in the future. Finally, the report closes with some key policy messages for EU neighbouring countries and the European Commission.
This report looks at the demand for career guidance services in EU neighbouring countries and provides a comparative analysis as well as policy and practical examples of career guidance in Montenegro, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Albania, Ukraine, Georgia, Russia, Egypt and Jordan. The issue of demand for career guidance services and provision has been somewhat neglected or underrepresented in similar and previous studies on less developed countries. However, this dimension is of crucial importance, in particular for transition economies and low- and middle-income countries for which whether career guidance should be a policy priority or an issue at all may be questioned. The report therefore analyses factors that influence demand for career guidance in the labour market and the economy, in education systems and in the policy climate. It examines the empirical evidence for career guidance demand and then analyses some of the factors that act as barriers to this demand being realised. The report also describes and analyses existing provision and models of career guidance in EU neighbouring countries, and introduces examples of innovative policies and interesting practices that are being adopted in order to respond to demand. It concludes with an analysis of the ways in which response to demand can be improved by strategic leadership, and discusses opportunities and constraints in responding to demand for services in the future. Finally, the report closes with some key policy messages for EU neighbouring countries and the European Commission.