Career guidance in the Mediterranean region - Comparative analyses (MEDA ETE regional project)

This cross-country report – covering ten Mediterranean Partners (Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, and the West Bank and Gaza Strip) – was built upon previous experience with career guidance reviews of the OECD, the European Commission, Cedefop, ETF and the World Bank. The analysis developed further the research methodology by paying particular attention to the socio-economic and cultural context of the Mediterranean region and its impact and limitations on career guidance services. Based on the assumption that career guidance is not only important for individuals, but can contribute also to a number of public-policy goals in education and training, in the labour market and in social cohesion and equity, it further took into account the paradigm shift in career guidance that is emerging in the EU and OECD countries, from ‘choosing a career’ to ‘constructing a career’, from ‘psychological testing’ to ‘tasting the world of work’, and from ‘external expert support’ to ‘career self-management skills’.
This cross-country report – covering ten Mediterranean Partners (Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, and the West Bank and Gaza Strip) – was built upon previous experience with career guidance reviews of the OECD, the European Commission, Cedefop, ETF and the World Bank. The analysis developed further the research methodology by paying particular attention to the socio-economic and cultural context of the Mediterranean region and its impact and limitations on career guidance services. Based on the assumption that career guidance is not only important for individuals, but can contribute also to a number of public-policy goals in education and training, in the labour market and in social cohesion and equity, it further took into account the paradigm shift in career guidance that is emerging in the EU and OECD countries, from ‘choosing a career’ to ‘constructing a career’, from ‘psychological testing’ to ‘tasting the world of work’, and from ‘external expert support’ to ‘career self-management skills’.